Volume 22, Issue 1 (Spring 2020)                   Advances in Cognitive Sciences 2020, 22(1): 36-48 | Back to browse issues page


XML Persian Abstract Print


Download citation:
BibTeX | RIS | EndNote | Medlars | ProCite | Reference Manager | RefWorks
Send citation to:

Esmaeilian N, Dehghani M, Moradi A, Khatibi A. Attention bias and working memory in people with borderline personality symptoms with and without non-suicidal self-injury. Advances in Cognitive Sciences. 2020; 22 (1) :36-48
URL: http://icssjournal.ir/article-1-916-en.html
1- PhD in Clinical Psychology, Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran
2- Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology, Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran, Iran
3- Professor of Clinical Psychology, Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Education and Psychology, Kharazmi University, Tehran, Iran
4- . Postdoctoral Researcher, Centre of Precision Rehabilitation for Spinal Pain (CPR Spine), School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom
Abstract:   (2264 Views)
Introduction: Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is considered as a chronic mental disorder accompanied by emotion dysregulation, dysfunctional interpersonal relationships, and self-injury. Despite a wealth of research on the neurocognitive process in BPD, there is no studies provide evidence for associations between BPD, RS, ARS, attention bias, and working memory (WM) functions. The present study aimed to investigate relationships between emotional WM operations, attention bias, rejection sensitivity, rumination, and BPD symptomatology; and compare BPD individuals with and without NSSI on these mentioned variables.
Methods: A sample of 39 participants with BPD + NSSI, 47 with BPD - NSSI, and 46 healthy participants were selected. The research tools included the Rejection Sensitivity Questionnaire (RSQ), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II), Anger Rumination Scale (ARS). All participants performed an emotional two-back task, and the dot-probe task.
Results: The more significant levels of borderline pathology, anger rumination, and rejection sensitivity were related to slower discarding angry and pain stimuli from WM and a higher level of attention bias to anger and pain. The obtained results revealed that people with BPD symptoms with and without NSSI show attention bias to anger and pain stimuli and are notably slower at discarding angry and pain stimuli from WM. BPD patients with NSSI were also slower at entering happy stimuli into WM compared to the other groups.
Conclusion: This study’s findings could point to a deficit in AB and WM operations to anger and pain cues that can help clinicians and researchers, make interventions for improving these cognitive dysfunctions in people with BPD with and without NSSI.
Full-Text [PDF 1442 kb]   (871 Downloads)    
Type of Study: Research |
Received: 2019/04/5 | Accepted: 2019/06/24 | Published: 2020/06/10

Add your comments about this article : Your username or Email:
CAPTCHA

Send email to the article author


Rights and permissions
Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Designed & Developed by : Yektaweb